Idaho Dispatch

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Numerous Legislators Receive Letter from “Korihor, the Anti-Christ”

By • June 3, 2021

Legislators receive a lot of emails throughout a legislative session.

Some emails are supportive of their efforts, while others are opposed. Sometimes the emails are simply inquiries about legislation and do not support or oppose the legislator’s efforts.

Once in a while, legislators will receive actual mail at their homes, but that is far less frequent than the emails they receive in their legislative inboxes, according to legislators we spoke with.

This week, at least ten legislators received a letter stamped from New York from a person named “Korihor” and the letter’s heading saying it was “FROM THE DESK OF THE ANTI-CHRIST.”

Some of the legislators who received the letter were Rep. Ron Nate (R-Rexburg), Rep. Tammy Nichols (R-Middleton), Rep. Greg Ferch (R-Meridian), Sen. Christy Zito (R-Hammett), Rep. Barbara Ehardt (R-Idaho Falls), Rep. Marco Erickson (R-Idaho Falls), and a few others who Idaho Dispatch knows about but did not get permission to share their names at this time.

Idaho Dispatch does not know who sent the letter because we are unaware of any way to contact the person who sent it. The name Korihor and the address have led some legislators to believe the individual was targeting legislators who are members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.

According to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saint’s website, Korihor is an individual from the Book of Mormon and is known as an “anti-Christ.”

In addition to the Korihor reference, the address in New York on the return label is the address for the original printing press where the Book of Mormon was originally published.

However, several legislators who were sent the letter are not members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, including Ferch, a Baptist.

The letter’s purpose is not exactly stated, but a quote within the letter is wording matching that of House Bill 377, an anti-Critical Race Theory bill passed this year by the Idaho legislature.

The letter itself discusses “Original Sin,” a reference to Adam and Eve, and then ties that into slavery.

One portion of the letter reads,

For if modern living Whites bear no inherent responsibility for the grotesque arrogance of Black slavery, wrought solely by the hands of their ancestors, then verily do they likewise bear no inherent responsibility for the alleged arrogance for the alleged arrogance of those long-dead rebels of Eden.

According to the author, Original Sin should not be taught in schools under the new law.

Zito says the ironic part of the letter is that members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints do not believe in “Original Sin.” Zito told Idaho Dispatch,

Despite this person seemingly going through great lengths to make references to things within our church, they did not seem to know about our 2nd Article of Faith which states, “We believe that men will be punished for their own sins, and not for Adam’s transgression.” Members of our faith do not believe in “Original Sin” and I thought it was amusing that the entire letter seemed to be aimed at discrediting an issue which I already don’t believe in.

Another side note is that Ehardt and Nichols’ letters were addressed as “Congresswoman” even though they are state legislators. Congressmen and women work in Washington D.C. at the capitol, whereas state legislators work at the capitol in the state where they reside.

All legislators seem to have received the same letter from what Idaho Dispatch has seen and been told by other legislators we have spoken with.

Here is the letter in full that Idaho Dispatch obtained from Zito. You can also see images of the envelope and letter below:

Verily doth I congratulate thee on taking the bold step of forbidding the promulgation of doctrine which asserts that “individuals, by virtue of sex, ethnicity, religion, color, or national origin, are inherently responsible for actions committed in the past by other members of the same sex, race, ethnicity, religion, color, or national origin.”

For in any addition to advancing thy political aims, dost this injunction also forbid the teaching of Original Sin; and hence halts any further penetration of Christianity into thy risible, benighted, pathetic school systems.

The vile doctrine of Original Sin clearly violates both the spirit and letter of thy new legislation, since it insists on the inherent responsibility, for actions committed only by Adam and Eve, of all their descendants, over six thousand years later.

By repudiating this vile doctrine of Original Sin, thou hast left they children’s minds correspondingly distanced from Christianity, and hence more receptive to the glorious notions I seek to plant therein.

This makes my task – the permanent destruction of thy lazy, reprehensible god, Yahweh, along with his obtuse and feeble 135th-trimester abortion, the bastard Nazarene carpenter – that much easier.

For if modern living Whites bear no inherent responsibility for the grotesque arrogance of Black slavery, wrought solely by the hands of their ancestors, then verily do they likewise bear no inherent responsibility for the alleged arrogance for the alleged arrogance of those long-dead rebels of Eden.

Savor thy first actual taste of knowledge of good and evil, ye smug and preening fools, for hath ye accidentally emancipated thy constituents from that most crushing and repugnant of all possible burdens: fealty to Christ.

Sincerely yours,

616

Some Christians believe that “616” is the real number for the “mark of the beast” and not the “666” number that is commonly used. It is unclear to the Idaho Dispatch if that is what the author intended as we have no way of reaching the individual who wrote it.

What do you think of this letter?

Let us know in the comments below!


Tags: Anti-Christ, Barbara Ehardt, Christy Zito, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Critical Race Theory, Greg Ferch, HB 377, Korihor, Ron Nate, Tammy Nichols